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I hear this all the time: oh you teach kid’s yoga? How fun!

They must love it and be so calm and flexible! You must be really good at the splits by now, huh?

Yeah, no.

I go to yoga for myself every morning and I teach 5 kids yoga classes every day and I still can’t do the splits.

Not only am I not super flexible, but the misconception of kids being super flexible threw me off my first few years of teaching as well.

Sure, some of them are, but not all kids are flexible.

And no they don’t all love yoga immediately.

Before I learned more about some of these supposed myths of kids and yoga, EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. was a struggle.

I spent hours lesson planning and I rewrote lessons every day after they bombed. I thought I knew how to teach kids yoga, but I was just not quite getting it.

I finally figured out I had some blinders up; I wasn’t approaching the problems the right way because I had some preconceived false ideas about how to teach yoga to kids.

I learned how to teach kids yoga to a specific set of kids and the ones I was teaching in my public school are VERY different.

Once I realized this, took a step back to reevaluate my stereotypes, I was able to approach with different ideas and tools in my toolbox.

Teaching yoga to kids is now a fun and rewarding part of my everyday life, and it all started with breaking down these myths:

Myth #1: Kids are naturally flexible and can do all the poses easily

Not all kids are flexible. Just like adults, our baseline flexibility is all different.

It’s important to recognize the variety and differences in kids bodies, without being judgmental. You can’t go into a class assuming all kids can touch their toes or do bridge pose.

Start with modified poses and then build up to poses that require more flexibility gradually as you get to know their level.

Myth #2: Yoga makes kids calm

Yoga can definitely help some kids be calmer and focused, but the act of doing the yoga poses doesn’t just magically calm them down.

You need to have the right sequence of poses, the right breathing techniques, and a calm environment to really help kids feel relaxed.

Even then, not all kids get to a point of calm that we can expect in adults—it just might not be in their personality. That’s ok!

Yoga is good for all kids because it can give them what they need. If you teach it the right way it can lead to calmer classrooms, but calm might look or sound different than what you expect.  

Myth #3: All kids love yoga!

Not true. Lots of kids love yoga, and if you are at a studio you might just have an entire class of little yoga lovers.

But if you are going into schools or trying to introduce yoga to your own kids, they might not warm up to it right away.

Many kids at my school still say outright to me that they hate yoga. I take their words with a grain of salt of course on any day. But I also tell them it’s okay to not love yoga, but it IS important to try.

Like math, yoga is a required subject at my school because we know it’s good for them. I never force them to do it, but I have come up with many strategies for helping them learn to at least appreciate it 🙂

I tell them WHY and HOW yoga is good for the bodies and their brains, I show them how they can use yoga and mindfulness practices to help get ready for a test, and how it helps athletes prepare for sports games.

Myth #4: You need to be a yoga teacher to teach kids yoga

As of right now, in most places, you don’t need to be a certified yoga teacher or a licensed teacher in order to teach kids yoga classes to bring yoga to the lives of the kids around you.

It does depend on where you are teaching, of course, (public schools have more requirements, yoga studios may as well). But if you have kids in your life, if you work with kids as a social worker or have your own children, you can definitely do yoga with your kids without a certification.

It helps to be familiar enough with yoga as a practice, but that experience can come from going to classes, doing yoga videos online, and just doing your own research.

Passion is the best educator, and if you have the will, you can find the way.

And if you have Kumarah Yoga, you will have the resources!

Myth #5: Teaching kids yoga is easy because you just do yoga and relax with kids

Absolutely not! Teaching kids yoga is hard.

It’s fun, but it took me a long time to feel that way every day.

The beginning was hard because I didn’t have my routines down, I didn’t know how to set up my room and space, I didn’t know how long it took to do a lesson and how much planning I needed to do.

It was hard because I didn’t have sequences that worked, and I didn’t know how to talk in way that would get kids to listen…

All of that being said, once you DO have the tools and experience to do it right, yes, teaching yoga is fun.

 

I get to do yoga every day with kids and relax. But it still isn’t always easy.

So, I bet your next big burning question is how DO you teach yoga to kids the right way?

How do you make it a little easier and a lot more fun?

 

Well, I have a lot of resources for you and have written a few great starter posts as well.

Games are a great way to start bringing yoga to kids a little at a time. I have several posts with awesome games ideas for whole class activities.

5 Active Kids Yoga Games to Have Fun with a Group

How to Play Engagingly Creative Yoga Games with your Kids or Students

I also created some beautiful kids yoga games that you can download and print.

Yoga Games for Kids Bundle: 

Storytelling and yoga go really well together.

I have a general post on how to teach kids yoga using stories and storytelling and several posts with examples on how to teach a yoga class based on a book:

How to Use Storytelling for Kid’s Yoga

Journey: An Active Kid’s Yoga Lesson Plan to Build a Love of Storytelling

Kid’s Yoga Story Lesson Plan based on the book Not a Box

Follow the Drinking Gourd: A kid’s yoga lesson plan with an equity mindset

 

You can grab copies of these lesson plans in my 7 Days of Kids Yoga and Mindfulness Freebies Library here too!

For some advice on the really hard stuff, like classroom management and sequence planning for kids yoga, check out these posts:

Learn to Calmly Manage Crazy Classroom Behavior in a Kids Yoga Class

Kids Yoga Sequences that Keep Kids Engaged

How to Start Teaching Yoga to Kids

Also, let me know what you need help with!

Reach out here by leaving a comment, or sign up for the 7 Days of Freebies and email me directly that way. I am happy to help with an email or a video chat, and I write posts based on what readers need to know.

 

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